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Assessing Birds

A Different Point of View

 

How often do we just race our birds and then breed more to take over next year, this cycle happening year after year. A few years ago I started thinking there must be a systematic way to assess your birds, especially your stock birds and give them a rating each year, therefore birds producing a higher number of good young worth keeping. I also looked at it from a consistency point of view. Thus birds producing 1 winner, are they better than birds breeding consistent birds, which are returning well to your loft. The 1 winner may have been a fluke, a freak chance on the day! The consistent birds only need to have a little pepper put into them, better feeding, training, management or faster bloodstock. The rating of birds depends on many factors, race difficulty, distance, number of birds in the race.

 

Now there are many indicators which can be used.

 

Now what I am talking about is to grade each pair each year and then add the individual bird’s figures each year and then obviously the individual birds with the best figures should be kept.

 

You will also see birds when mated to different partners either losing or gaining with their rating numbers, so this then gives an indication of better producing birds again.

 

Maybe you start with a table to assess your birds.

Pair A

Toss

Race 1

Race 2

Race 3

Race 4

Race 5

Race 6

Race 7

Race 8

Race 9

Race 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now you can also visualise whether you lose birds in tossing or at which race point or in tossing etc. You can assess which round is your best producing round; you can also give your birds a rating if they are in the top 10 percent of the clocked birds, also top 10 percent back to your loft. I prefer to assess at loft level first and then worry about the next level from there; after all you are trying to sort out your own stock birds first. The position of your loft can also be a factor in your club positions, so assess your birds against themselves before worrying about comparing to others, but do not lose sight of the competition or otherwise you may end up too far behind to ever catch up.

 

You give no points for any birds lost in training; you can give 1 point for every 100km race point (therefore 200km = 2 points and so on), you can then give bonus points for birds which are in the top 10% back to your loft, maybe 0.1 thus not over inflating value in your birds. You could also give bonus points if you consider the race to be more difficult, eg strong wind, rain etc.

 

Thus if Pair A loses all youngsters before first race they have no Points. I am not saying that this is the only system, once again I am suggesting fanciers look at different aspects of out sport and try to maybe study and understand our birds better. So if Pair A has youngsters fly quite well through out the season, there points will accrue better than pairs with poor performances by offspring.

 

Example No. 1

Pair A

Toss

Race 1

Race 2

Race 3

Race 4

Race 5

Race 6

Race 7

Race 8

Race 9

Race 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 1

 

 

H

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 2

 

H

 

TZ

 

T

 

H

 

T

 

Sq 3

 

 

H

 

H

 

X

 

 

 

 

Sq 4

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 5

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 6

 

H

 

HZ

 

H

 

H

 

X

 

 

Race 1 & 2 = 100km, Race 3 & 4 = 200km, Race 5 & 6 = 300km,

Race 7 & 8 = 400km, Race 9 & 10 = 500km

X = Lost

T = Top 10% (back to Loft)

H = Home

Z = Hard race.

 

Therefore points for this pair are as follows

Pair A

Toss

Race 1

Race 2

Race 3

Race 4

Race 5

Race 6

Race 7

Race 8

Race 9

Race 10

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 1

 

 

1

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Sq 2

 

1

 

2.2

 

3

 

4

 

5.1

 

15.3

Sq 3

 

 

1

 

2

 

0

 

 

 

 

3

Sq 4

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Sq 5

 

 

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Sq 6

 

1

 

2.1

 

3

 

4

 

0

 

10.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

29.4

 

Example No. 2

Pair B

Toss

Race 1

Race 2

Race 3

Race 4

Race 5

Race 6

Race 7

Race 8

Race 9

Race 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 1

 

H

 

H

 

H

 

X

 

 

 

Sq 2

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 3

 

H

 

 

H

 

H

 

X

 

 

Sq 4

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 5

 

 

H

 

H

 

H

 

H

 

H

Sq 6

 

 

H

H

 

H

 

H

 

H

 

 

Therefore points for this pair are as follows

Pair B

Toss

Race 1

Race 2

Race 3

Race 4

Race 5

Race 6

Race 7

Race 8

Race 9

Race 10

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sq 1

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

 

 

10

Sq 2

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Sq 3

 

1

 

 

2

 

3

 

0

 

 

6

Sq 4

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Sq 5

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

15

Sq 6

 

 

1

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

46

 

 

Therefore, Pair B had consistent birds and scored more points, even though they lost 2 youngsters before the 1st race. The 4 remaining youngsters flew very well. It is up to the individual fancier to work out systems and actually have some sort way of assessing their birds, many fanciers do not really have any idea of what is good and what is not.

 

The best possible score is for each youngster to fly each distance and get 15 points, therefore 15 X 6 = 90 points.

 

So you now consider this:

 

Super Pair = 80 – 90

Great Pair = 70 – 79

Good Pair = 40 – 69

Average Pair = 20 – 39

Below Average = 10 - 19

Useless Pair = 0 – 9

 

What you then do is add the figures each year for each cock and hen and after a period of years you should be able to quickly view your best producing pairs and have the proof of this as well based on performance of their young.

 

Once again this is only my system that I am developing and maybe it will even change further as you need to evolve and seek ways to improve or you will die out like the dinosaurs. This system can also be used to grade your race birds! So you grade both stock and race birds and at the end should end up with better birds all round.

 

Once again I must say, these are ideas, how you use them is up to you!

 

 

Yours in the Sport,

 

Barry Trewin